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2 edition of The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies found in the catalog.

The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies

by Julian Lincoln Simon

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Published by College of Commerce and Business Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in [Urbana, Ill.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (leaves [36-39]).

StatementJulian L. Simon
SeriesFaculty working papers -- no. 33, Faculty working papers -- no. 33.
ContributionsUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. College of Commerce and Business Administration
The Physical Object
Pagination25, 4, 5, [5] leaves :
Number of Pages25
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24622498M
OCLC/WorldCa701414591

While both developed and developing countries have contributed to global environmental problems, developed countries with 85% percent of the gross world product and 23% of its population account for the largest part of mineral and fossil-fuel consumption, resulting in significant environmental impacts. The precise relationship between population growth and per capita income has been inconclusive in the literature and the nexus has been found not clearly explain the determinants of rapid population growth in developing countries that lacks fertility control and management framework. This forms the rationale for this study to access the trend of factors that influence rapid population growth.

Population growth explains why some countries grow rich and others remain poor. Fig. shows that an increase in the rate of population growth from n, to n 2 reduces the steady-state level of capital per worker from k* to k* 2. Since k* is lower, and because (y*) =f(k*), the level of output per worker y* is correspondingly lower. Population growth was similarly 0% during the first millenium and % in Western Europe and % in India between and [Maddison, ]. World population grew on average less than % per year between 1 and [Livi-Baci.

The economic growth rate is calculated from data on GDP estimated by countries' statistical agencies. The rate of growth of GDP per capita is calculated from data on GDP and people for the initial and final periods included in the analysis of the analyst.. Long-term growth. Living standards vary widely from country to country, and furthermore the change in living standards over time varies. Demand for freshwater is rising with factors, such as population growth, land use change and climate variations, rendering water availability in the future uncertain. Groundwater resources are being increasingly exploited to meet this growing demand. The aim of this study is to identify the influence of population growth induced by land use change and climate change on the future state of.


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The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies by Julian Lincoln Simon Download PDF EPUB FB2

The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies / Pages; The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies / By. Simon, Julian Lincoln, If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel free to enter the title and author information.

Cited by: 4. The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies / Related Titles. Series: Faculty working papers ; no. Simon, Julian Lincoln, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

College of Commerce and Business Administration. Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies by Simon, Julian Lincoln, ; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. College of Commerce and Business AdministrationPages:   Chapter 3: The Influence of Population Growth on Income in Developed Economies: Data, Theories, and Micro-Economic Variables was published in The Economics of Population Growth Author: Julian Lincoln Simon.

FACULTYWORKINGPAPERS CollegeofCommerceandBusinessAdministration UniversityofIllinoisatUrbana-Champaign November19, TheInfluenceofPopulationGrowth onPer Cited by: 4. The growth rate of per capita income roughly equals the difference between the growth rate of income and the growth rate of population.

Kenya’s annual growth rate in real GDP from tofor example, was %. Background paper prepared for the Working Group on Population Growth and Economic Development, Committee on Population, National Research Council, Washington, D.C.

Schultz, T.W. () Investment in population quality in low income countnes. in P.M. Haieser, ea., World Population and Development: Challenges and Prospects. But it is possible that the effect of population growth on economic development has been exaggerated, or that no single generalization is justified for countries differing as widely in growth rates, densities, and income levels as do today's less developed areas.

The relationship between population growth and growth of economic output has been studied extensively (Heady & Hodge, ).Many analysts believe that economic growth in high-income countries is likely to be relatively slow in coming years in part because population growth in these countries is predicted to slow considerably (Baker, Delong, & Krugman, ).

population growth and depressed economic performance is strongest among the poorest nations of the developing world, and that the effect on this group extends back through the s and s. The growth of gross domestic product can be constrained by high dependency ratios, which result when rapid population growth produces large proportions.

The conclusion that rapid population growth has slowed development is by no means straightfor-ward or clearcut (see Box ). Under certain condi-tions moderate population growth can be benefi-cial. As Chapter 4 showed, in Europe, Japan, and North America economic growth has been accom-panied by moderate population growth, which.

Population growth plays a crucial role in every country’s development process. Thus, both demographers and development economists emphasize on the population growth–economic development nexus. Much like what is found in Table 3, (D it H it) is positive in developed economies (Tercile 3), with a significant coefficient of %, and (D i t D e m o c r a c y i t) has a positive effect on growth in developing economies only (Terciles 2 and 1), with significant coefficients of.

factors that influence rapid population growth in developing countries between and This paper examined the comparative trend review of population growth determinants between developing countries (Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Mexico and Nigeria) and developed.

Past, current and projected future population growth is outlined. Barring a calamitous pandemic, a further increase in the world’s population from 7 to between and 10 billion by mid-century. -diminishing returns to capital lower the real interest rate and eventually economic growth slows and just keeps up with population growth -capital per worker remains constant ~problems with this theory: all economies have access to the same technologies and capital is free to roam the globe, seeking the highest available real interest rate.

ADVERTISEMENTS: The neoclassical growth theory was developed in the late s and s of the twentieth century as a result of intensive research in the field of growth economics. The American economist Robert Solow, who won a Noble Prize in Economics and the British economist, J.

Meade are the two well known contributors to [ ]. But on a more general scale, population growth can strain economies unless there are enough people and resources to support it. Effect of Population on Resources Population growth was a concern as far back aswhen English economist Thomas Malthus predicted that it would eventually reduce overall living standards.

Rapid population growth also affects UDCs in relation to the world economy in a number of ways. First, rapid population growth tends to increase income disparities between UDCs and developed countries because the per capita incomes decline with growth in numbers in the former.

Second, rapid population growth encourages international migration. Posted by Meee, a resident of Ventura, on at pm. Much of this is assumption based since hard data is hard to come by for fragile nations, which tend to have most growth.

(). The influence of family size on efficiency within the farm: An Irish study. (). The influence of population growth on per-worker income in developed economies (mimeographed). The intra-family allocation of time: The value of the housewives'time.

(). The life-cycle hypothesis: A reinterpretation and empirical test. (). While the life expectancy of retirees is increasing, birth rates have fallen by nearly 50% since the s.   A key factor to economic prosperity in the developed .Continued slowing in population growth at all income levels is suggested in Figure “The Demographic Transition at Work: Actual and Projected Population Growth”.

Between andthe world population grew at an annual rate of 2%, suggesting a doubling time of 36 years.